Museum of Literary Wonders

Museum of Literary Wonders #4

Museum of Literary Wonders

Hello, and welcome back to the Museum of Literary Wonders! Are you ready for another part of the tour? Perhaps some of you have just joined us for the first time today, in that case let me explain. I am Rinn, the curator and your tour guide for today. The museum holds many wonderful objects from many different worlds and universes, preserved in this museum because of their importance – perhaps they hold a lot of meaning, perhaps they’re important plot points or maybe just because they’re pretty… For whatever reason, they have been carefully stored in the museum collection so that generation after generation can learn about them. Without further ado, let us go on!

Sabriel


museum_bells

The name of these Necromancer’s Bells is deceiving, as they were also used by the Abhorsen in the Old Kingdom, both to bind and raise the dead. Made of silver with mahogany handles, they are infused with both Charter and Free Magic, and as a result are very dangerous. A full set has seven bells, the names of which are Ranna, Mosrael, Kibeth, Dyrim, Belgaer, Saraneth and Astarael. In the hands of the wrong person, they could cause utter chaos, hence the high security around this exhibit.

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Jeep


museum_jeep

Perhaps you remember reading in the newspaper about a new dinosaur ‘theme park’ with real live dinosaurs, and how it all went terribly wrong? People eaten by a tyrannosaurus rex, ripped to shreds by velociraptors? No? Well anyway, this is one of the jeeps from Jurassic Park – one of the few that wasn’t stomped on or ripped apart by a hungry king of the lizards. And don’t worry, it was carefully checked before it arrived here – no compsognathuses hiding away in the boot or anything…

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True Blood


museum_trueblood

Perhaps you recognise this bottle of True Blood. Perhaps it’s something you consume on a regular basis. It may be an every day object for some people, but it also marks a historical event: the creation of synthetic blood by Japanese scientists, which enabled vampires to come ‘out of the coffin’, and reveal their existence. The revelation that vampires were real changed a LOT – new rules and regulations, political and religious stances against and for vampires, many people turned against neighbours and friends. Whatever you may think about it, it was certainly a game changer.

Are there any questions about today’s tour? What exhibits would you like to see next?

Museum of Literary Wonders

Museum of Literary Wonders #3

Museum of Literary Wonders

Hello, and welcome back to the Museum of Literary Wonders! Are you ready for another part of the tour? Perhaps some of you have just joined us for the first time today, in that case let me explain. I am Rinn, the curator and your tour guide for today. The museum holds many wonderful objects from many different worlds and universes, preserved in this museum because of their importance – perhaps they hold a lot of meaning, perhaps they’re important plot points or maybe just because they’re pretty… For whatever reason, they have been carefully stored in the museum collection so that generation after generation can learn about them. Today we’re going to head into the Young Adult exhibit!


labelmockingjay

This Mockingjay pin was apparently the symbol of rebellion in a land called Panem. Supposedly, the citizens of Panem had to take part in a horrific event called ‘The Hunger Games’ every year, where young people from each of Panem’s districts would have to fight to the death. Their history books have recorded that one year, a young girl by the name of Katniss Everdeen managed to beat the system, and become a figurehead of a rebellion that changed Panem forever. The Mockingjay was her ‘symbol’, and apparently this was the very same Mockingjay pin that she wore!

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Image source


This glass slipper was discovered in New Beijing. As far as we can tell, it belonged to a cyborg by the name of Cinder – who also happened to be the best mechanic in all of New Beijing. Research into this artefact is still ongoing!

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Riptide

Riptide is the sword previously belonging to the demi-god and son of Poseidon, Percy Jackson. Previously owned by Hercules, Riptide was forged thousands of years ago from Celestial Bronze, and it has been passed down through the years to various gods and demi-gods. It can be disguised as a normal object, for example a pen, but we have succeeded in dispelling the ‘Mist’ (that covers the eyes of mere mortals as opposed to mighty gods!) around this particular artefact, so you can view it in its full glory. You can see that it is engraved with a trident, a symbol of Poseidon. Its original name was ‘Anaklusmos’.

Are there any questions about today’s tour? What exhibits would you like to see next?

Museum of Literary Wonders

Museum of Literary Wonders #2

Museum of Literary Wonders

Hello, and welcome back to the Museum of Literary Wonders! Are you ready for the second part of the tour? Perhaps some of you have just joined us for the first time today, in that case let me explain. I am Rinn, the curator and your tour guide for today. The museum holds many wonderful objects from many different worlds and universes, preserved in this museum because of their importance – perhaps they hold a lot of meaning, perhaps they’re important plot points or maybe just because they’re pretty… For whatever reason, they have been carefully stored in the museum collection so that generation after generation can learn about them. Without further ado, let us go on!

Please do not touch the exhibits!

There have been many reports that these strange objects are in fact dragon’s eggs. Perhaps they were at one time, but now they’re petrified and will never hatch – good thing too, imagine the damage they could do. But no need to worry, that will never happen! They were found in a wide expanse of grassland known as the ‘Dothraki Sea’, and kindly donated by a bearded and behatted gentleman.

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Please do not touch the exhibits!

This signet ring may not look very flashy or expensive, but it certainly has a lot of meaning. It supposedly belonged to the Scarlet Pimpernel, a mysterious and elusive (and demmed!) figure who rescued various members of the French nobility from the guillotine during the French Revolution. Every time he freed a family or person, he would leave a note, complete with a wax seal stamped by this very ring. Odd’s fish, what a brave man!

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Please do not touch the exhibits!

This strange contraption is a Voight (or Voigt)-Kampff test. Supposedly it was used as an interrogation tool, to determine whether someone was human or android, as at the time the two were almost indistinguishable – apart from an androids lack of empathy. Therefore the interrogator would ask questions to design emotional responses. Fascinating!

Are there any questions? What exhibits would you like to see next?

Museum of Literary Wonders

Museum of Literary Wonders #1

Museum of Literary Wonders

Hello, and welcome to the Museum of Literary Wonders! I see you already have a ticket, right this way! I am Rinn, the curator and your tour guide for today. The museum holds many wonderful objects from many different worlds and universes, preserved in this museum because of their importance – perhaps they hold a lot of meaning, perhaps they’re important plot points or maybe just because they’re pretty… For whatever reason, they have been carefully stored in the museum collection so that generation after generation can learn about them. And now, onto our first exhibit…

Snitch_2

This strange object is known as a Golden Snitch. It is reportedly used by wizards in their popular sport, ‘Quidditch’, and this particular Snitch has great value, being the first one caught by the infamous Harry Potter. It also played a crucial part in the search for the Deathly Hallows, by Harry Potter himself, along with his friends Ronald Weasley and Hermione Granger – the very same search that resulted in the death of He-Who-Shall-Not-Be-Named… oh, okay… Lord Voldemort. I know what you’re thinking: how can we lock it up like this? Don’t worry, we let it out of the case at night, to fly free around the museum! It can be a bit of a pain getting it back in though…

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Ringfrodolabelonering

And this, lovely literary enthusiasts, is no other than the One Ring, the very one that Frodo Baggins carried through Middle-earth and threw into the fiery heart of Mount Doom! Don’t ask how we got hold of it. We have our ways… yes we do, precious… Er, yes. Anyway. It is particularly important to the curator here, because The Lord of the Rings is one of her absolute favourite books of all time, and apparently many others too, being the second best-selling book of all time. This iconic artefact is known all over the world – do you know anyone who hasn’t heard of The Lord of the Rings? (if you do, I suggest throwing a copy of the book at them as punishment for their blasphemy. Preferably a copy of the three books in one.)

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Perhaps some of you have heard of the great detective, Mr. Sherlock Holmes? Maybe some of you have even used his services… well here on display we have his beloved Deerstalker hat, which is often teamed with a cape and pipe to create his iconic image. Unfortunately some vandal has scribbled all over this specimen, tsk! Sherlock Holmes has been an inspiration for many a detective over the past century, rightly so as he is a brilliant, witty and incredibly intelligent man able to deduct information from the smallest of clues. In fact, considering that I’m amazed he hasn’t realised that we’ve stolen his hat.

And now, dear visitors, what would you like to see on the next part of the tour?