Review

Review: After the Silence (Amsterdam Quartet #1) by Jake Woodhouse

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1 out of 5 stars | Goodreads

I received a copy of this book for free from the publisher, in exchange for an honest review.

I may not read the genre that often, but I do enjoy a good crime novel. Sadly, After the Silence is not one of these.

I picked it up initially because it was set in Amsterdam, and I’m always eager to read more books set in the Netherlands. However, the setting here is completely inconsequential: it could literally be set anywhere else in the world and it would make zero difference. We get some Dutch names, a few well-known locations in Amsterdam but otherwise you could just transport it anywhere else, which was a real shame. Not as much of a shame, however, as the absolutely atrocious characters that After the Silence contains, every single one a horrible, horrible stereotype:

  • The main character is a cop who had a career changing tragic moment pre-book, which we get to see in badly timed flashbacks. Since then he left the force, went to Japan and ‘found himself’, and came back.
  • The main female cop is constantly objectified by her colleagues, her soon to be boss makes lewd suggestions about how she might rise through the ranks and SHE DOES NOTHING ABOUT IT. This is so infuriating. She’s clearly a tough lady, judging by what she’s been through and what she does for a living, so why does she put up with this crap?
  • There’s the cocaine addicted, homophobic, racist and misogynistic cop who I’m supposed to somehow feel sorry for?? Er, no. No thanks.
  • Literally every policeman (and I say man, because Tanya is the ONLY female cop in the Netherlands apparently) is racist and homophobic and misogynistic and it made me SO ANGRY.

 

I can’t even really comment too much on what happens. It wasn’t a particularly special crime novel, there were no stunning twists or big reveals, and I was mostly just distracted by how disgusting these characters were, these people who were meant to be protecting society. And if it’s not bad enough, of course Jaap and Tanya hook up, because how on earth could a male and female cop work together without that happening? I spent the entire duration of this book feeling very angry, and the only positive was that it was at least quick to read, and needless to say I won’t be searching out the next one in the series.

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Monthly Roundup

Monthly Roundup: January 2017

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Every first Wednesday of the month, I’ll be posting a roundup of the month just gone, including discussing books read that month, challenge progress, and a summary of all posts for the month.

Last month I read a total of fifteen books: The Death Cure (The Maze Runner #3) by James Dashner, The Girls by Emma Cline, The Versions of Us by Laura Barnett, Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (Harry Potter #4) by J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (Harry Potter #3) by J.K. Rowling, Yes Please by Amy Poehler, 1Q84 (1Q84 #3) by Haruki Murakami, The Fry Chronicles by Stephen Fry, After the Silence (Amsterdam Quartet #1) by Jake Woodhouse, The Terranauts by T.C. Boyle, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets (Harry Potter #2) by J.K. Rowling, Saga Volume 1 (Saga #1) by Brian K. Vaughan and Fiona Staples, Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone (Harry Potter #1) by J.K. Rowling, The Dead Men Stood Together by Chris Priestley and Elizabeth of York: The First Tudor Queen by Elizabeth Weir.

January was a month of unemployment, and therefore left me a lot of time for reading… yet still I fell into a bit of a slump. Not so much a general reading slump, as I still managed 15 books, but I lost interest in a lot of the SFF on my shelves and all the books I’d borrowed from the library, and felt like reading something a bit different. I aimed to get through quite a few of my Netgalley books and managed to cross quite a few off the list. I also started re-reading the Harry Potter series (because why not?), and finally read the first volume of the Saga graphic novels, which was excellent. I also re-read Amy Poehler’s autobiography, Yes Please, because I love her. The Girls was a bit of a disappointment after all that hype, and I finally finished the Maze Runner series!

 

Challenge progress:

  • Mpauli is not hosting the DC vs. Marvel Challenge this year, instead the Justice League vs. Teen Titans Challenge is being hosted by the wonderful Wayland, who is also the newest moderator of Dragons & Jetpacks. I won’t be keeping track of this on the blog, just on the book group, as I don’t plan on being quite so dedicated this year. Although I felt really proud that I managed to complete the challenge 100% in 2016, it did dictate quite a bit of my reading so I’m going for a more relaxed approach in 2017.
  • I have currently read fifteen books towards my Goodreads goal.

 

Currently reading:

How was January for you?

Misc.

Books Set In The Netherlands

It’s now been over two weeks since I left the Netherlands, but that’s not going to stop me posting about it! In this post I wanted to share some books set in that wonderful country. Whilst I searched high and low for books set in different provinces, there is definitely a bias towards Holland. I was only able to find books set in either Zuid-Holland or Noord-Holland, so whilst it’s not completely representative of the entire country, it’s a start! Feel free to suggest other titles in the comments. 🙂

Books set in the Netherlands

1 – 3. Haarlem

The Black Tulip The Hiding Place The First Sir Percy

The Black Tulip by Alexandre Dumas, The Hiding Place by Corrie ten Boom and The First Sir Percy by Emmuska Orczy

4 – 7. Amsterdam

The Dinner After the Silence by Jake Woodhouse Quicksilver Tulip Fever
The Dinner by Herman Koch, After the Silence by Jake Woodhouse, Quicksilver by Neal Stephenson and Tulip Fever by Deborah Moggach

8. Den Haag/The Hague

Lust for Life
Lust for Life by Irving Stone

9 – 10. Delft

Girl with a Pearl Earring The Golden Tulip
Girl With A Pearl Earring by Tracy Chevalier and The Golden Tulip by Rosalind Laker

Have you read any of these, or do you have any suggestions?

Past Features

Weekly Roundup #35

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My ‘Weekly Roundup’ is where I share the books I have received in the past week, whether bought, gifted, borrowed etc.

Bought (ebook)

Partials by Dan Wells

Netgalley

I seriously, seriously suck at this not requesting everything from Netgalley thing…

Sheltered Volume 1 by Ed Brisson & John Christmas Red Sonja Volume 1: Queen of Plagues by Gail Simone & Walter Geovanni Mass Effect: Foundation by Mac Walters The Troop by Nick Cutter After the Silence by Jake Woodhouse The Unseemly Education of Anne Merchant

  • Sheltered Volume One by Ed Brisson & John Christmas – I like dystopia. I like graphic novels. Ergo, I will probably like this.
  • Red Sonja Volume One: Queen of Plagues by Gail Simone & Walter Geovanni – apparently a reimagining/reboot of the original character, which I know nothing about. But graphic novels! Swords and sorcery! Yay!
  • Mass Effect: Foundation by Mac Walters – if you know me, you know I’m a little bit obsessed with Mass Effect, and read all the books based on the series that I can get my hands on, despite them not often being very good. Well I’ve actually already read this one and it’s possibly the best so far – review to come shortly.
  • The Troop by Nick Cutter – this sounds like a super creepy version of Lord of the Flies, which I had to read in school and really enjoyed. When I got approved for this book I went to download it and found out it had been archived, which puzzled me – but then it appeared back on the site so luckily my ratio shouldn’t get messed up (or… any more messed up…)
  • After the Silence by Jake Woodhouse – I wanted to read more books set in the Netherlands, so here we are! This might not be the best book to read though, as it’s about murders…
  • The Unseemly Education of Anne Merchant by Joanna Wiebe – this has a very strange mix of DNFs and five star reviews on Goodreads… I’ll just have to read it myself and find out!

What new reads do you have this week?