Sci-Fi Month

Announcement: Sci-Fi Month 2017

Yes, you read that right – Sci-Fi Month is happening again this year! I think people were a little uncertain because I’ve not been so active in the blogosphere, but I definitely want to continue with this tradition! 🙂 Once again, Lisa will be co-hosting with me for the third year running.

So here’s the important stuff…

What is Sci-Fi Month?

Sci-Fi Month is a month-long blog event during November, that I hosted for the first time in 2013, created to celebrate everything amazing about science fiction. From TV shows to movies, books to comics, and everything else in between, it was intended to help us share our love and passion for this genre and its many, many fandoms. It was such a success – and I honestly wasn’t expecting that many people to join in – that people were already asking in December whether it would be held again the next year! It happened again in 2014, co-hosted by Oh, the Books!, and again in 2015 & 2016, when Lisacame on board.

Sci-Fi Month has a schedule that all participants can add to, meaning everyone can clearly see what is being posted each day. This also encourages participants to comment on and visit other blogs. More information on adding to the schedule below.

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When is Sci-Fi Month?

Sci-Fi Month happens all November long, and takes place online – through each participant’s blog, Twitter feed, and other social media websites.

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Who can participate?

Anyone! Bloggers, authors, readers, publishers – the first year saw over fifty bloggers, twenty-five authors and three publishers taking part regularly, as well as plenty more commenting, Tweeting, discussing and sharing the love for sci-fi, and this has only increased each year since. Even if you’re not a blogger, you’re taking part just by reading, commenting and Tweeting!

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How can I sign up?

As with previous years, there is no deadline for signing up – if you only learn about the event halfway through November, you’re more than welcome to join!

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What sorts of things should I post for the event?

Let your imagination run wild! If it involves science fiction, then post about it! In previous years, we’ve had all kinds of activity, including:

  • reviews
  • interviews
  • discussions
  • quizzes and puzzles
  • bingo cards
  • top ten/favorite lists
  • giveaways

And it doesn’t have to be books. We had so many posts on TV shows, films, video games and all different kinds of things last year.

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How do I add my posts to the schedule?

We are continuing to use the Google Docs spreadsheet. Everyone adds their own details, which makes it much easier. There are tabs for different post types, and details entered include post date, title, author, link to post etc – and these can be added at any time, even before the post has gone up, or several days after if you forget. Please try to add your posts to the appropriate category, although me and Lisa can move them if you’re unsure.

You can find the schedule spreadsheet here.

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Is there a hashtag I can use to promote the event?

Yes! Please use the #RRSciFiMonth hashtag on Twitter, Tumblr, Facebook, and everywhere else! We also have an official twitter account: @SciFiMonth.

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Are there any official Sci-Fi Month graphics I can use on my blog?

Yes, please feel free to use the ones I have created, graphics from previous years, or make your own.

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Who can I contact if I have more questions?

You can email me at rinnreads(at)gmail.com, tweet me at @RinnReads or @SciFiMonth. You can also contact Lisa through Twitter at @EffingRainbow. Or alternatively, you can comment on this post.

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Participants

The participant list can be viewed here.

I will be sharing more information in the run up to November, so stay tuned!

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Giveaway, Sci-Fi Month

Sci-Fi Month 2016: Mission Complete + Giveaway

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This post is part of Sci-Fi Month 2016, a month long event to celebrate science fiction hosted by myself and Over the Effing Rainbow. You can view the schedule here, follow the event on Twitter via the official @SciFiMonth Twitter account, or with the hashtag #RRSciFiMonth.

November has now come to an end, and with that another Sci-Fi Month! 2016 was the fourth annual Sci-Fi Month, and just as much of a success. I have been so proud of everyone who has taken part in this event since I started it in 2013 – you’ve shown me that science fiction is not the niche genre I once thought it was. Whilst we don’t always see science fiction in the mainstream – have you ever seen a science fiction title in a supermarket bestselling book chart? – it is definitely popular. And maybe even all our hard work this month has converted some new sci-fi fans, or encouraged people to try out new sub-genres or mediums of science fiction that they wouldn’t have considered before.

I have to admit, and some of you might have noticed, that November was not my month. It started out so well – for the first 10 days or so I tweeted every single post on the day it was posted, was full of enthusiasm. After that, I started slacking, not touching things for a few days, then catching up, but not always commenting – and I definitely haven’t commented on every post like I’d hoped.

And, as I’ve been open about my depression on here before, I will be honest and say that that was the reason why. It came back with a bite in November. I am really struggling with not being where I want to be in life in terms of my career. I withdrew from a lot of things in my life, and basically just shut myself away in my room playing video games or reading. For that reason I’ll probably be rather inactive throughout December whilst I focus on job hunting, as it is going to definitely involve moving again. A massive thank you to everyone for continuing to post and celebrate science fiction whilst I disappeared into the background a bit.

And now for this year’s Sci-Fi Month stats:

These stats were accurate on 29th November, when this post was written.

  • We had a total of 71 participants (at least), which includes authors, publishers and bloggers. And that’s not including all those who read and commented, but didn’t post, so the actual number is a lot more!
  • 315 posts were shared in November, especially for Sci-Fi Month.
  • Most of these were reviews, as with every year, but we also posted others. More specifically… (as of 29th November 2016)
    • 31 intro and wrap up posts
    • 123 reviews
    • 21 discussions
    • 63 lists
    • 12 guest posts/interviews
    • 23 fun & games posts (quizzes etc)
    • 42 misc posts (Waiting on Wednesday etc)
  • Authors reviewed included Wesley Chu, Nina Allan, Isaac Asimov, Emma Newman, Ann Leckie and so many more.
  • The book (or rather books) that seemed to appear the most throughout 2016 were Illuminae and Gemina by Amie Kaufman and Jay Kristoff.
  • Topics discussed ranged from Star Trek to Farscape, dystopia, the importance of science fiction, women in science fiction, starship crews, sci-fi fandoms, time travel, ‘unpopular’ sci-fi opinions, movies and TV shows, robots, aliens, the best reads for book groups, sci-fi tropes, art and music.
  • According to Twitter Analytics, during November the @SciFiMonth account gained 42 new followers, tweeted/retweeted 322 times, and was mentioned 280 times. I also sent out 114 tweets in October, advertising previous years posts in order to build up interest.
  • My own Twitter account gained 12 new followers, and tweeted/retweeted 141 times, the large majority of which were SFM related.
  • I tried out a few tools to track the #RRSciFiMonth hashtag, just to see how many times it had been used in November but couldn’t find one that showed the entire month. However, I did find something interesting via Keyhole. #RRSciFiMonth had a reach of 216,984 in just 10 days, which means that many individual people saw the hashtag! That’s pretty amazing. The image below shows data for the hashtag between 18-28 November 2016:
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  • Like previous years, I spent hours re-tweeting, tweeting, commenting, maintaining the schedule and making sure things were up to date, as well as just generally spreading the word about the event. So think of all the time we must have collectively contributed towards putting Sci-Fi Month together!
  • Please let me know if you’d like to see anything changed/improved/added for next year, or you have any ideas or suggestions for 2017! 🙂

Thank you so much to everyone who took part this year – without you it would not have been possible!

I have two giveaways to say thank you, one is international and the other is UK only so please make sure you enter the correct one! The UK based giveaway is provided by Titan Books, and is for The Race by Nina Allan. The international giveaway is open to all countries that the Book Depository ships to for free, and is for Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick.

The Race Do Androids Dream Of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick

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Giveaway, Sci-Fi Month

Sci-Fi Month 2016: Giveaway of Aliens by Jim Al-Khalili

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This post is part of Sci-Fi Month 2016, a month long event to celebrate science fiction hosted by myself and Over the Effing Rainbow. You can view the schedule here, follow the event on Twitter via the official @SciFiMonth Twitter account, or with the hashtag #RRSciFiMonth.

Aliens

Today I’m offering the chance for three of my readers (UK only, sorry!) to win a brand new shiny copy of Aliens by Jim Al-Khalili, kindly provided by Profile Books.

Here’s a description of the book from the Profile Books website:

It’s the biggest question we’ve ever faced, one that has fascinated generations of humans: do aliens exist? If they did, what would they look like? How would they think? And what would it mean for us if we found them?

Here, Professor Jim Al-Khalili blasts off in search of answers. Featuring twenty pieces by top scientists and experts in the field including Martin Rees, Ian Stewart and Adam Rutherford, Aliens covers every aspect of the subject, from alien consciousness to the neuroscience behind alien abductions. And along the way he’ll cover science fiction, the probability of us finding extra-terrestrial life, and whether recently-discovered exoplanets might support life.

Engaging, authoritative and filled with scientific insights fresh from the far edges of the galaxy, Aliens is the perfect book for anyone who has ever looked up into the starry sky and wondered: are we alone?

Or why not hear more from the man himself?

If you’d like to enter the giveaway, just use the Rafflecopter below! This giveaway will remain open until 12th December 2016, and don’t forget you can share the tweet via the Rafflecopter every day for an extra entry!

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Review, Sci-Fi Month

Sci-Fi Month 2016: Review of Revenger by Alastair Reynolds

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This post is part of Sci-Fi Month 2016, a month long event to celebrate science fiction hosted by myself and Over the Effing Rainbow. You can view the schedule here, follow the event on Twitter via the official @SciFiMonth Twitter account, or with the hashtag #RRSciFiMonth.

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5 out of 5 stars | Goodreads

I received a copy of this book for free from the publisher, in exchange for an honest review.

When I was first sent a copy of Revenger for review, my immediate thought was of the excellent but criminally short-lived TV show Firefly. However I seem to draw this comparison now for all books revolving around a spaceship crew. I love stories of life on a spaceship, from Firefly to my favourite video game Mass Effect.

Unlike many of the previous tales I’ve read, watched or played, Revenger is told from the point of view of a teenage girl. Arafura is a privileged young woman, the youngest daughter of a wealthy man. Her sister, Adrana, is the more confident of the two, the more adventurous and bolshy. Arafura seems meek and timid, reluctant to follow her sister into trouble but also too scared to let her go off alone. The book starts with them escaping their ‘nanny bot’ and stowing away on a ship, where the adventure begins.

There is just so much action from the very beginning of this novel that it is impossible not to feel draw in instantly. I was unsure of Arafura as a narrator at first – the boring sister, perhaps, the less adventurous one – but actually this decision worked so well. The reader follows Fura as she grows in confidence and matures, as she learns what revenge means. There were plenty of other likeable characters too, although there wasn’t always time to get to know some and get a sense of who they really were due to a rather quick changeover in some cases. The villain of the story, Bosa Sennan, has some fantastic folklore built around them that really made me feel as if humankind had been space-faring peoples for centuries. And the idea that Bosa Sennan’s ship could just come out of nowhere, undetected was pretty terrifying.

I actually really enjoyed the premise of what the ship’s crew actually did – exploring abandoned alien bases/ships/planets, that were only accessible during certain periods of time, and looting everything that could be found. I’d love a whole novel based purely around that! It sounds like some cool sort of space archaeology/exploration.

Whilst this is pitched as a Young Adult novel, don’t let that put you off if you’re not normally a reader of YA. Similarly, if you’ve ever felt intimidated by Alastair Reynolds’ galaxy-sprawling works of science fiction, don’t be scared off by this one. The tone is completely different, his writing style almost unrecognisible from his previous work such as House of Suns, but every bit just as fantastical and epic. To top it off, the cover is simple but so perfect, demonstrating the vastness and emptiness of space.

Sci-Fi Month

Sci-Fi Month 2016: Blogger Panel #2

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This post is part of Sci-Fi Month 2016, a month long event to celebrate science fiction hosted by myself and Over the Effing Rainbow. You can view the schedule here, follow the event on Twitter via the official @SciFiMonth Twitter account, or with the hashtag #RRSciFiMonth.

It’s time for the second blogger panel, where I pose a science fiction related question to a selection of book bloggers! If you want to answer the question as well, let us know your response in the comment section below. 🙂 The question for this panel was:

If you had a time machine, where/when would you go, and why?

Anna @ There’s Always Room For One More

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Anna (@imyril) has been reading for nearly as long as she’s been walking, and arguably with greater success – or at least fewer bruises. She has a lot of very heavy books about archaeology and/or King Arthur on her shelves, most of which she has read, along with a glorious amount of more portable speculative fiction that she can read on the Tube. Favourite things beyond books include movies, cats, whisky and getting lost. Her musings can be found on her blog and on Twitter.

If I had a time machine…

As Rinn knew when she posed it, this is one of the most difficult questions you can pose an archaeologist. Even a recovered archaeologist (who am I kidding? You never recover). I studied archaeology because of all the things we don’t know, and I am fascinated by the gaps. The chance to examine one – just one – historical or mythical moment is a choice that makes my heart explode. My blood pressure has gone up just considering it.

But in some ways, it’s easy. I can get agitated and rattle off so many places and times (Justinian’s Constantinople; Troy VI; Crete after the eruption of Thera; Akhenaten’s Egypt), but I specialised in Dark Age economics (an academically acceptable option for an undergrad fascinated by Arthurian lore) so there can only ever really be one outcome. We know more than we ever have done about Anglo-Saxon ’invaders’ and the enduring links between post-Roman Britain and the Mediterranean, etched in broken amphorae and plague-carrying ship rats, but we still don’t know what to believe about Arthur.

If I set my time machine for Camelot, I have to assume it would draw a blank. The myth is just that – a beautifully illustrated body of stories concocted across Europe over centuries. But if there’s one thing the Doctor has taught me about having access to a time machine, it’s that you get to cheat a little. The transformation of post-Roman Europe is fascinating in its own right: I’d like to take a journey through the 5th through 8th centuries looking for the truth behind the myths and the realities of life in the ‘Dark Ages’. And maybe – just maybe – find a war leader who united the British and led them to victory against their enemies… even if it’s Vortigern, not Arthur.

There’s still a bit of me that’s shouting GO TO THE FUTURE. But at the moment, I’m not sure whether spoilers would really make me feel any better, so I’ll stick with my ancient past.

Jorie @ Jorie Loves A Story

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Jorie is a book blogger and passionate reader at Jorie Loves A Story. She says that her blog was ‘inspired into creation due to a reader’s love and passion for the written word’.

She can be reached either through her blog or via Twitter (@JorieStory).

Such a curious question to be asked as this is something I have personally contemplated for such a long time – especially moreso now that I’ve become a book blogger and have regularly sought out stories which either travel through time or bend time within the narrative arc where the journey of the character has an equal foothold in both the present and the past; sometimes even within the future or an alternative variant of said future. Through my readings, I have garnished a healthy appetite of questioning my own opinion on the matter – would I travel through time if the opportunity presented itself? Or would I yield to understanding it’s best to live our lives forward rather than disappear back inside the past?

It’s a multi-layered question – as if you go by popular commentary found in fiction, television and motion pictures – you’ll find the discourse is not only actively commentated about but it’s a working thesis that has a variety of avenues to explore. One particular TV series comes to mind – it wasn’t inherently about ‘time travel’ but you knew going in something was ‘amiss’ on the time spectrum if the facts within the newspaper were meant to be found by one particular person who could impart his perception of those facts and events by making the best possible choice regarding what to do with the information. The series was called Early Edition and on a similar vein of Dr Beckett travelling through the quantum leap of time itself – both men strived to right wrongs and put people’s lives back on track. They did this from a genuine belief that they were given an ability to do good and it was their personal mission to fulfill that purpose.

When you approach it from a singular point-of-view, of personally travelling through time you have to re-consider the affect this is going to have on the continuum of time itself and how one individual person could effectively alter something that was originally non-existent in their timeline – either lived or unknown from their ancestral past as expertly explored in the new TV series Timeless, which embarks on exploring how individuals who are propelling themselves backwards through time’s arrow for a distinct purpose of stopping someone from aggressively altering history itself. Yet, as foreseen early into the series, each ‘step back’ leads to a ‘new tomorrow’ for their own timelines and histories – wells, technically in the beginning it only affected one character’s life, but evenso! It begged the question – are we meant to travel back or are we meant to continue to learn from the past without personally travelling there ourselves?

During Sci Fi Month 2014, I read A Stitch in Time by Amanda James wherein I revealed this:

A theory on time, the traveller who knits it back together, and the reality of time travel:

James reveals the basis of her running theory on the full dimension of being a time traveller and one who intends to not only travel along the meridians of time but on fusing time as a broken structure of record back together again; with a propensity of precision generally relegated to knitters or sewers. I, personally, loved what the time traveller’s mentor and guide is called inside the story (as a Time Needle sounds ever so posh) as ‘needling with time’ simply made a heap of sense to me! Time travellers by definition can either muck up an alignment of the continuum itself OR they can create positive contributions by causing a deviant of order as they re-distribute a level of calm within the chaos. I even liked how she parlayed her theory within the title of the novel itself, by using a Stitch in such a clever execution of a person’s job rather than rely solely on prior knowledge the reader may or may not have had as far as vetting information on the subject for themselves.

And, this is exactly my point. If a time traveller can effectively cause a positive outcome from their meddlings in time, then I think there is validity to time travel. However, it begs the question – how many who’d travel in time honestly consider the consequence of leaving a light footprint and not interfering when it’s unnecessary to do so? How many would have that kind of self-restraint?

Since 2014, I have also consumed the duology of Eruption and Reclamation by Adrienne Quintana, The Memory Painter by Gwendolyn Womack and an alternative timeline of history in Kate Johnson’s The Untied Kingdom. In each of the stories, you are given valid arguments where time travel is a valid method of resolving something that has been left unresolved. Even in Doctor Who we are constantly reminded of the consequences of ‘spoilers’ a la River Song and of the key reasons why travelling in time is so very dangerous to one’s soul (i.e. the main reason the Doctor is older rather than younger is due to personal anguish for what he couldn’t change nor resolve the memories of those he had lost); yet where does that leave any of us to understand our own personal desire to re-visit the past?!

For me, I used to think having conversations with historical persons I had admired was the best way to chart a course into the past – my admirations for these women and gentlemen have never diminished, however, as I have started to journey into my own ancestral past as an Ancestry Sleuth inside my own family, I must lament there is a strong curiosity to re-visit my own ancestral roots through walking alongside my own ancestors at moments where they made key life decisions or lived moments of their ordinary hours where they were simply themselves caught up in the moment of living their lives.

To re-step through their footsteps – as I am only two or three generations away from the patriarchs of my family who immigrated to America, to see how they braved the ocean and conquered their fears to re-settle so far from their homes whilst uncertain of what they’d find once they were here is quite compelling. Even to go back to the late 1800s and walk through the hours with my great-grandmother of whom was my first best friend and watch as she took in the dawning of the 20th Century and how it shaped her thoughts and experiences from a Victorian upbringing would be incredible. To even go back further, to when the Fortune sailed from England to Plymouth and how my ancestors had to work off seven years of debt in order to stay in New England as the Fortune came without supplies would be incredible.

The only concern I still have – as a time traveller of stories and of an ancestral sleuth of memories – it is hard to turn-off the knowledge I have gained about how even one breath spent in the past can affect the future of tomorrow. Is it right to have the curiosity lead us into uncharted territories where our conjoined living histories could be altered like they are becoming in “Timeless” or is there a way to broker a foothold into the past without erasing the moments which already were lived yet give us a gain of entrance to observe? Perhaps the truer answer is meant to be left unknown. As how would any of us know exactly how we’d react if the choice was presented to us tomorrow? Would we lean on our foreknowledge or would we impulsively act on the hope of what we’d dare to find as seen in the film Midnight in Paris?

Tammy @ Books, Bones and Buffy

I think most people would probably choose a time from the past to visit, but me? I would most certainly want to visit the future. Even though things are looking pretty bleak on Earth, I think I’m enough of an optimist to envision a future filled with marvelous technology, alien visitors (the nice kind, of course) and a better quality of living for all. I’d like to think that scientists would have figured out the global warming problem and Earth would still be habitable in the next several hundred years or so.

I’m also very curious to see what my future ancestors (wait, is that a thing?) would be like, will my kids grow up to have kids of their own? And will they grow up to have kids? I’d love to visit my future relatives and see where everyone ends up. And wouldn’t it be cool to jump ahead in time and be able to see your present life as the past? What cool technology do we have today that will most certainly become obsolete in the future?

Plus, I really really want to visit some of the science fiction worlds I’ve read about in books, and who’s to say those worlds won’t become reality someday? Of course, I could jump ahead to the far future and wind up in a swirling mass of volcanic fire, but like I said, I’m an optimist…

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Tammy Sparks blogs at Books, Bones & Buffy, and tries to read and review as much speculative fiction as she possibly can, while working full time, raising two teens, and volunteering for her kids’ various school activities. You can also find her on Twitter: @tammy_sparks.

Claire @ Bitches With Books

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Claire blogs at Bitches with Books. She can be reached via her blog or Twitter (@BWithBooks).

Ok, so my magical time machine is even better than that, it can move back between worlds (fictional or real) and throughout time!

So on first instinct, I think I’d go to The Shire and visit Hobbiton or even Lothlórien at its founding, before the Ring of Power was made. It just seems like a peaceful time in the stories and I’m imagining such lush, beautiful nature and good food. I’d basically just hit up a bunch of pubs or sort of convince hobbits, men and elves that I’m an awesome guest and that we should all have a massive feast! Is it bad that all I want to do is eat a good meal like I was at Bilbo Baggins’ birthday party? On second instinct, I’m not sure that’s a terribly good idea because I imagine that my appearance and dress and loud manner would be quite shocking and unappealing for some?

My third instinct is to go to the world of magic (like in Harry Potter) and visit Hogwarts when it was first founded by the great four, to travel to my home country in the Caribbean and see the magic that happened there with the melting pot of cultures, to go throughout Asia, the Middle East and Africa to see how magic was explored and transformed with culture and time. I think that would be the best, to see that kind of awesome magic!

Let me know your own response to the panel question in the comments below! 🙂

Author Interview, Giveaway, Sci-Fi Month

Sci-Fi Month 2016: Author Interview with Daniel Godfrey + Giveaway

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This post is part of Sci-Fi Month 2016, a month long event to celebrate science fiction hosted by myself and Over the Effing Rainbow. You can view the schedule here, follow the event on Twitter via the official @SciFiMonth Twitter account, or with the hashtag #RRSciFiMonth.

At the beginning of 2015, you may have seen me obsessing over a book called New Pompeii, by Daniel Godfrey, which sounded like a Jurassic Park-inspired novel focused around Pompeii – basically my dream novel. With career ambitions focused around archaeology, I cannot get enough of anything set around the ancient world – especially if there’s a clever sci-fi spin to it.

Cut to one year later, and New Pompeii turned up on my doorstep, thanks to the excellent Titan Books. And then when I announced that Sci-Fi Month was returning for 2016, I soon noticed that a certain Daniel Godfrey had signed up for the event. It must be fate, right? Daniel was kind enough to let me interview him, so without further ado…

What gave you the inspiration for New Pompeii?

Daniel: New Pompeii came out of basically trying to do too many things at once: I was playing around with a few short stories that I’d written some years before – all relating to paradox and multiple timelines – whilst at the same time reading about ancient Rome. I’ve always been interested in Rome – it crops up in a lot of science fiction – and the two things came together because…

Why did you choose Pompeii in particular to bring through time?

Daniel: … of an interesting anomaly. One of the most deeply unsettling things about Pompeii are the plaster casts of its victims. In the best (or worst!) of these, you can see the expression of terror on the person’s face at the moment of their death. And yet there aren’t many of these casts: most of the remains simply haven’t been found – even though we know there were few, if any, survivors. Of course, they could have run but we know a lot of Pompeii was still very much active right up to the point of its destruction. Commercial ovens were found full of baking bread, for example. Painters and decorators were also out fixing things. So it just sort of worked: the plaster casts, the volcano, the missing people…

New Pompeii

If you had the chance to visit any place in history, where would you go and why?

Daniel: I’d have loved to have witnessed some of the space race in the 1960s. For all the excitement of the last couple of years in terms of visiting Pluto and Rosetta/Philae, I don’t think it comes close to the competition between the USSR and USA which culminated in Apollo.

Do you see any similarities between yourself and any of your characters?

Daniel: A-ha! No, bu I’ve heard a few writers at conventions say every character harbours a part of them. And when I had lunch with my editor in the summer, I made a comment which she said sounded just like [CHARACTER]. But I’m not going to say who!

What are your top science fiction novels and films?

Daniel: I’m a child of the 1980s, so in terms of films it would be The Empire Strikes Back, and Back to the Future. A lot of people say that Luke staring at the twin suns of Tatooine is the key shot of Star Wars – for me though it’s the arrival in the carbon freezing chamber aboard Cloud City: Vader already waiting and silhouetted in orange light. “You are not a Jedi yet…”

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More recently, I’ve enjoyed things like Minority Report and Edge of Tomorrow. In terms of novels, I really like Timothy Zahn’s Thrawn trilogy. Now completely superseded by the prequels and Episode VII of course, but still a lot of fun, and I think it’s interesting Disney are bringing Thrawn back to the TV shows but in a different era. Whether he’ll work in another context…? I hope so!

Who would be your dream dinner party guests, dead, alive or fictional (!), related to science fiction?

Daniel: Given what I’ve just put above… can I have Grand Admiral Thrawn?

If so, then the party would be Thrawn, Dana Sculley, Captain Picard, The Doctor and Amy Pond, and Ellen Ripley!

Thank you so much to Daniel for letting me interview him! He has also kindly provided a signed copy of New Pompeii for one lucky reader.

Please note that this giveaway is limited to the UK only. Apologies to my readers outside the UK!

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Daniel Godfrey is the author of New Pompeii, which was published by Titan Books in June 2016. He is also currently working on a sequel to New Pompeii. Daniel can be reached through the following links:

Giveaway, Sci-Fi Month

Sci-Fi Month 2016: Titan Books Giveaway

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This post is part of Sci-Fi Month 2016, a month long event to celebrate science fiction hosted by myself and Over the Effing Rainbow. You can view the schedule here, follow the event on Twitter via the official @SciFiMonth Twitter account, or with the hashtag #RRSciFiMonth.

The excellent SFF publisher, Titan Books has provided some amazing prizes for this year’s Sci-Fi Month! There are two sets of prizes to be won. Unfortunately, these are limited to UK only – however I will be having an international giveaway at the end of the month, so please keep an eye out for that if you’re based outside of the UK!

The first contains the following titles: New Pompeii by Daniel Godfrey and Escapology by Ren Warom.

New Pompeii escapology

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The second contains the first two books in the Vicious Circuit series by Robert Brockway: The Unnoticeables and The Empty Ones.

unnoticeables empty ones

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Thank you to Titan Books for the prizes! 🙂