Monthly Roundup

Monthly Roundup: December 2014

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Every first Wednesday of the month, I’ll be posting a roundup of the month just gone, and writing about what’s to come in the next few weeks.

December 2014

Last month I read a total of thirteen books: The Gunslinger (The Dark Tower #1) by Stephen King, In the Company of the Courtesan by Sarah Dunant, Dear Daughter by Elizabeth Little, Moriarty (New Sherlock Holmes #2) by Anthony Horowitz, Yes Please by Amy Poehler, The Oxford Murders by Guillermo Martinez, Seraphina (Seraphina #2) by Rachel Hartman, Across the Universe (Across the Universe #1) by Beth Revis, The Lost Hero (Heroes of Olympus #1) by Rick Riordan, Revival by Stephen King, The Slow Regard Of Silent Things (The Kingkiller Chronicles #2.5) by Patrick Rothfuss, Newt’s Emerald by Garth Nix and Confronting the Classics by Mary Beard.

My standout books for the month were definitely Revival by Stephen King, and Seraphina by Rachel Hartman. I have a review of Revival coming up so I won’t talk about it now, but Seraphina caught me totally by surprise. I also really loved Amy Poehler’s Yes Please – I have so much love and respect for her. It was also fantastic to finally start The Dark Tower series by Stephen King!

 

Challenge progress:

  • I read five books towards the Avengers vs. X-Men Challenge. The challenge is now over, and I earned a total of ninety-four points for my team! There is now a DC vs. Marvel Challenge for 2015.
  • I read 135 books towards my Goodreads goal, and managed to complete it – my goal was 120!

 

Currently reading:

The Blade Itself by Joe Abercrombie

How was December for you?

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Review

Review: The Slow Regard Of Silent Things (The Kingkiller Chronicles #2.5) by Patrick Rothfuss

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4 out of 5 stars | Goodreads

I received a copy of this book for free from the publisher, in exchange for an honest review.

Having recently finally read The Wise Man’s Fear, the second book in the epic Kingkiller Chronicles series by Patrick Rothfuss, I couldn’t wait to make a start on The Slow Regard Of Silent Things. As much as I love Rothfuss’ series, I thought it would be refreshing to get a different viewpoint, see the story from the point of someone other than Kvothe. I really love Kvothe as a character, but I feel like I’ve spent a lot of time with him, as each book clocks in at almost 1000 pages.

Auri’s story is definitely something new. It’s not so much a new perspective on Kvothe’s tale, as Kvothe himself does not make an appearance, but it was fascinating nonetheless to hear from someone else in Kvothe’s world. Despite being book number 2.5, you could probably read this one after either book, but definitely not without having read at least The Name of the Wind. It makes the assumption that you already know Auri (or really, why would you have picked the book up?), at least as well as a reader can know her. Auri is another character that I’ve always loved within the series – she has that aura of mystery that actually somehow still remains, even after reading this book.

I always had a sense that Auri knows more than anyone else, and just doesn’t let on, and The Slow Regard of Silent Things only makes me more sure of this. She may be the only character in the book, but the inanimate objects seem to come to life the moment they come into contact with her, as if she breathes life into everything she touches. It says so much about Patrick Rothfuss’ writing that he can make a story about a young girl going about her rather peculiar day-to-day activities into something so fascinating and delightful.

If you’re worried that this book will reveal too much about Auri and who she is, then there is no need – it is a wonderful insight into the life of Auri that somehow leaves her more of a mystery than ever, and that’s what I really like about it.